Sporting History
Elephant Polo 2

ELEPHANT POLO

Although elephant polo was first played in India at the beginning of the twentieth century, the modern game originated in Meghauli, Nepal, following a meeting in Switzerland between the late Jim Edwards and James Manclark. It started out as a whimsical conversation between the two sport lovers and evolved into the adventurous sport of polo played on the back of elephants. The World Elephant Polo Association established the governing rules for Elephant Polo in 1982; the association has its headquarters at the Tiger Tops Jungle Lodge in the Royal Chitwan Park in Nepal, which is where the World Elephant Polo Tournament played every year on a grassy airfield in Megauly. This tournament is played within a small circuit of Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand.
The Tommy Woodcock (The Strapper)
A strapper is employed to look after a horse and often has a very close relationship with the horse. A strapper’s duties range from cleaning horse stables, feeding and brushing the horse and preparing a horse for track work and racing. This includes fitting the saddle and adjusting it as the horse’s fitness increases and body shape changes. Strappers lead race contenders from the horse stalls to the mounting yard before passing them over to the riding jockeys. After their arduous run, strappers are there to greet the horses, feed and care for them, and hose them down to help them relax and regain their normal breathing rate. Each year the strapper of the winning horse in the Melbourne Cup is awarded the Tommy Woodcock trophy named after Phar Lap’s strapper.
Polo is an Outdoor Sport
Polo is an outdoor sport, so dress according to the weather. You really can't be over or under dressed. Spectators at a polo match wear everything from jeans to high fashion. If the polo match you're attending is a major tournament, charity benefit match or special event, you may want to dress up. If you want to go divot stomping at halftime, and you should, it's a good idea to wear shoes for health reasons and a hat for sun protection. Other than that, be comfortable. Polo clubs allow spectators to bring food and drinks. So pack a picnic lunch of items that will travel well for an afternoon sporting event.
Polo Match 600BC
BETWEEN THE TURKOMANS AND THE PERSIANS. TURKOMANS VICTORIOUS. The origin of Polo goes back to Persia in the 5th century BC. Polo was at first a training game for cavalry units, usually the king's guard or other elite troops. To the warlike tribesmen, who played it with as many as 100 to a side, it was a miniature battle. The first known game was between the neighboring Turkomans and the Persians in 600BC. The Turkomans were victorious. The Moguls were largely responsible for taking the game from Persia to the east and, by the 16th century, the Emperor Babur had established it in India. (It had already long been played in China and Japan, but had died out by the time the West came in contact with those countries). In the 1850s, British tea planters discovered the game in Manipur on the Burmese border with India. They founded the world's first polo club at Silchar, west of Manipur. Other clubs followed and today the oldest in the world is the Calcutta Club which founded in 1862.
Patripatan




In India the cat is recognised as a magical bringer of luck.

Indian legend tells of a man who sent his cat, Patripatan, to go to a heavenly realm in order to retrieve a special flower. 

Patripatan was so cunning and so softly insidious that when he climbed into the land of Devendiren in the sky (where there reigned twenty-four million gods and forty-eight million goddesses) he became the friend of the all-powerful king of the gods and the beloved confidant of the most beautiful of the goddesses. He did so much and so well that for three hundred years he forgot to come down again to the earth. And while the prince and the inhabitants of the kingdom of Salangham awaited his return, not a person aged by a single hour during all the hours and days and years that passed. At last Patripatan returned. In his white paws he brought a complete and heavy branch of that rarest talisman-flower of Parasidam, in full flower. And from that day there was nothing but gentleness and beauty in that kingdom.
Muswellbrook Polo Club 1880
E. Reg White founder of the NSW Muswellbrook club reminisced that the fun had gone out of the game that he had played in his youth during 1880 and 1890.

"My word we used to see the skin fly then. We used to put the ball in the centre of the field, the teams would retreat to their own goal lines and – at the drop of a hat, be given the signal to charge. I remember one day a chap had a leg broken, another was knocked out and still another had an awful spill. My, it was good! We used a solid hardwood ball, any kind of wood. No umpires in those days. And none of your cane sticks. You’d often see a player with a bit of hoop iron fixed to his stick to give it strength”!!
John Cutts Riding Archer
Over 4,000 people crowded the banks of the Maribyrnong River to witness the running of the first Melbourne Cup on the first Thursday in November. Archer was well supported by racing enthusiasts in New South Wales but the crowds at the first Cup at Flemington tended to give their backing to local horses. For Etienne de Mestre, it was an opportunity to secure his title as a master trainer, and for jockey John Cutts it was a chance to enter the history books. The first Melbourne Cup started chaotically with a false start and the fall of three of the seventeen runners. But this did not break Archer’s strength and determination. After the crowd’s favorite horse Mormon raced to the lead, Archer stormed past and won by 6 lengths in 3 minutes 52 seconds. This was the slowest time run in Melbourne Cup history because the track was quite primitive. Archer’s jockey, John Cutts, who rode Archer in 16 of his 17 starts, dressed in black silks.
Game of the Century
The current rules of Australian football may be traced to a meeting held on May 17, 1859 at the Parade Hotel, later the MCG Hotel, on Wellington Parade. There, four members of the Melbourne Football Club – William Hamersley, Thomas Smith, James Thompson and Tom Wills – drafted the 10 laws that form the platform from which the Australian code evolved. Geelong v South Melbourne played on 4 September 1886 is, arguably, the most important Aussie Rules game to be played in the 19th century. Although regular final games had not yet been instituted, the VFA arranged this game so as to determine the Premiers for 1886; both teams had gone through the season undefeated. The game was held at South's Emerald Hill ground and a then-record crowd of 34,121 paid 6d per head for a total revenue of ₤747/7/-. It was said that many more crowded into the ground without paying.
Elephant Polo

ELEPHANT POLO

Although elephant polo was first played in India at the beginning of the twentieth century, the modern game originated in Meghauli, Nepal, following a meeting in Switzerland between the late Jim Edwards and James Manclark. It started out as a whimsical conversation between the two sport lovers and evolved into the adventurous sport of polo played on the back of elephants. The World Elephant Polo Association established the governing rules for Elephant Polo in 1982; the association has its headquarters at the Tiger Tops Jungle Lodge in the Royal Chitwan Park in Nepal, which is where the World Elephant Polo Tournament played every year on a grassy airfield in Megauly. This tournament is played within a small circuit of Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand.
An Elegiac Lament
Australia’s first volunteer surf life saving clubs appeared on Sydney’s ocean beaches in 1907.  Prior to this date by-laws banned bathing in daylight hours. The surf was new to most beach goers and many could not swim. As a consequence came more drowning and attempts at rescue. 

By the summer of 1906-07, the population of Sydney was obsessed with the question of the safety of the surf.  It was in this environment that surf life saving clubs first emerged; their regular patrols a welcome relief to local authorities and nervous bathers alike. 
2011 Flood-The Coomera River


In six hours the Coomera River went from a calm waterway to surging rapids that wiped out everything in its path, even tearing horses and cows from paddocks. Horses and cows struggled against the current -- some scrambled to the safety of riverbanks but many others drowned.

The numbers of livestock lost, including horses, is still undetermined but they are expected to be extreme, with reports of up to 40 horses perishing at one stud alone and stables full of horses drowning as the incredibly fast rising water forced handlers to scramble through the rafters to the roof.