9 Ante Portas 2016
Up Rode the Squatter
Two Rams
Sheep Dog
Rams Head
Granite Gathering
Girraween Gathering
Elizabeth Jessie Hickman Lady Bushranger - The Hideout

ELIZABETH JESSIE HICKMAN 1890-1936 LADY BUSHRANGER

Elizabeth Jessie Hickman’s early years were spent growing up in a travelling circus. This provided her with handy horsemanship and survival skills. Upon leaving the circus she ended up living with a violent and abusive man. One night after a drunken abusive episode, Jessie struck him over the head and killed him. She buried the body so that it was never found and then spent years on the run hiding out in remote caves and canyons around Nullo Mountain, now the Wollemi National Park. It was inaccessible and wild; real bushranger country. While in the remote wilderness, Hickman joined a team with notorious cattle duffer, Andy Black, before forming a duffing gang of her own. The lady bushranger was finally captured in the late 1920s. Even then, Hickman's friends helped plan the ultimate getaway. Legend has it that on the day that she was to face court, the cattle that were to serve as evidence mysteriously went missing under the watch of an Aboriginal police tracker who Hickman had been on friendly terms with. When the trial came there was no case and Hickman was released. She died of a brain tumor in 1936.
Elizabeth Jessie Hickman Lady Bushranger - Circus Performer

ELIZABETH JESSIE HICKMAN 1890-1936 LADY BUSHRANGER

Elizabeth Jessie Hickman’s early years were spent growing up in a travelling circus. This provided her with handy horsemanship and survival skills. Upon leaving the circus she ended up living with a violent and abusive man. One night after a drunken abusive episode, Jessie struck him over the head and killed him. She buried the body so that it was never found and then spent years on the run hiding out in remote caves and canyons around Nullo Mountain, now the Wollemi National Park. It was inaccessible and wild; real bushranger country. While in the remote wilderness, Hickman joined a team with notorious cattle duffer, Andy Black, before forming a duffing gang of her own. The lady bushranger was finally captured in the late 1920s. Even then, Hickman's friends helped plan the ultimate getaway. Legend has it that on the day that she was to face court, the cattle that were to serve as evidence mysteriously went missing under the watch of an Aboriginal police tracker who Hickman had been on friendly terms with. When the trial came there was no case and Hickman was released. She died of a brain tumor in 1936.
Cows Head
Chores